Environment

Two-Day Composting Workshop Available for Educators

Two-Day Composting Workshop Available for Educators

WALDOBORO, Maine -- The Maine Compost Team at the University of Maine Forestry and Agricultural Experiment Station at Highmoor Farm in Monmouth is offering a two-day composting workshop June 28-29 for staff and teachers at educational institutions around the state and beyond.

Participants will learn how to make use of recyclable, organic school waste materials and plant school gardens. The workshop provides an opportunity to learn how to close the circle between food and waste in schools, according to UMaine Extension Professor Mark Hutchinson, who will lead the course.

The program will challenge participants to think critically about waste reduction, develop an integrated waste-recycling program and learn how it fits into the current school curriculum.

Gorgeous Spring Day

Gorgeous Spring Day

This was the first truly gorgeous weekend of the spring. I decided today after going out for a morning coffee that I was going to spend some time outside and NOT working in my yard. I talked to my kids and we decided to check out Bradbury Mountain and see if we could see the hawks that are being counted this time of year. Unfortunately my 11 year old daughter was no longer interested since she had decided to start working on her science fair project for 6th grade, dissolving hard candy in different liquids and recording the times. So my son and I took off for the mountain.

Real vs Fake: Which is the Greenest Christmas Tree?

The Nature Conservancy Weighs in On Holiday Tree Debate
 
BRUNSWICK, ME — More than half of American families now choose fake Christmas trees over natural, a trend that could have serious consequences for our environment.
“The Nature Conservancy is all about trees — they clean our air, they clean our water,” said Frank Lowenstein, Climate Adaptation Strategy Leader for the Conservancy.
Fake trees are usually made from a kind of plastic called polyvinyl chloride (PVC) which is derived from petroleum, and is manufactured using processes that have been criticized for air and water pollution as well as energy use.
Approximately 85% of the fake trees sold in the US are shipped here from China. Most of China’s electricity comes from burning coal — the dirtiest source of electricity. Once the fake trees are made, they still have to be shipped across the ocean — usually in a diesel-fuel powered ship.